Living in a Toxic Environment
Photo: East Yard Communities for Environmental Justice
A SWITZER NETWORK LEADERSHIP STORY

Living in a Toxic Environment

Posted by Lauren Hertel on Wednesday, July 30 2014

Fellows: 

Why is Isella Ramirez’s environmental justice work so personal? She grew up in Commerce and, while she expresses her love for her community, she also knows first-hand what it is like living in a toxic environment. Situated in the midst of a major transportation hub, Isella, her 6-year old niece Citlalih, and neighbors are surrounded by the busy l-710 freeway that accommodates up to 260,000 cars and over 40,000 diesel trucks on a daily basis, rail yards, and blocks and blocks of industries reliant on the freeways and rail yards.

 
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