Become a Fellow

The Switzer Fellowship Program offers one-year Fellowships to highly talented graduate students in New England and California whose studies and career goals are directed toward environmental improvement and who clearly demonstrate leadership in their field. The Fellowship provides a $15,000 cash award for academic study, leadership training, access to a vibrant network of over 570 Switzer Fellowship alums, and opportunities for professional development during the Fellowship year and beyond.

Through the Switzer Fellowship Program, the Foundation supports environmental leaders for the 21st century who have the ability, determination and integrity to effect positive change.  Only the most active, committed and focused individuals will compete successfully to join the Switzer Fellowship Network of over 570 Fellows selected since 1986.

Switzer Fellows are working in a wide range of environmental fields including the traditional environmental sciences such as biology, chemistry and engineering, but also environmental policy, economics, conservation, public health, journalism, urban planning, environmental justice, business and law.  Switzer Fellows are committed to interdisciplinary work, applied results, and collaborative leadership.

There is one application deadline per year. Application guidelines and the online application are updated by October 1 for each annual cycle.





"I found the Switzer Network services available to Fellows to be exceptional.  The fall retreat was a great opportunity to interact with other Fellows from my cohort, and learn about the diversity of work we are involved with."

Melanie Allen

Spotlight on Leadership

Studying the role of infectious disease and perceptions of ecological change
2014 Fellow Andrea Adams’s dissertation research involves the study of disappearing frogs in Southern California. “One species, the foothill yellow-legged frog (Rana boylii) disappeared from the region during a short period of time in the mid-1960s to early 1970s,” Andrea explains. “One thing that can cause such rapid declines in amphibians is the pathogenic amphibian chytrid fungus. I study this fungus’s distribution and disease dynamics in different amphibian species in Southern California to see if it could have been a major contributing factor to the disappearance of the foothill yellow-legged frog in the region. To do this, I conduct molecular work in the laboratory, as well as field and museum work.”Read more >

A vibrant community of environmental leaders