Science in the Rapidly Warming Gulf of Maine
Photo: gulfofmaine.org

Putting Science to Work in the Rapidly Warming Gulf of Maine

Putting Science to Work in the Gulf of Maine

Grant Type: 

  • Leadership Program

Fellows: 

Award Date: 

May 2017

Amount: 

$25,000

Location: 

Brunswick, Maine

With Switzer Leadership Grant support, Manomet hired Marissa McMahan in a new staff position of Senior Scientist, based in its Brunswick, Maine, office.  Marissa took the lead on developing a viable, long-term applied science program helping Maine's fishing communities with climate adaptation strategies to respond to a rapidly warming Gulf of Maine.  The program is multi-dimensional, and focuses its efforts on invasive species (the European green crab), and formerly southern species (black sea bass) which are now moving into the Gulf of Maine and affecting existing fisheries and ecosystems.  Marissa works with clam harvesters being affected by the invasive green crab which preys on New England's native soft shell clams in an effort to develop and refine clam farming techniques.  She is also developing fisheries and markets for a green crab fishery to help reduce the numbers of this invasive predator.  Finally, Marissa will be continuing her research working with fishermen, scientists, and fisheries managers to accurately document the population numbers of black sea bass as it continues to move into the warming Gulf of Maine.  

Grant Outcome: 

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